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Olie is known for its island-inspired designs, natural fabrics and simplistic design sensibilities. So when I found that they had an entire section dedicated just to boxes, I was thrilled. Thrilled to note that they’re using left over fabric to make gifting and storing a pleasure.

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These boxes – available in rectangles, hexagonals, rounds and squares – are wrapped neatly in fabric and finished fine.

Ideal for storing your preciouses or gifting treasures to your preciouses.

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Find Olie ware here.

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Alta or Rose Bengal is a deep red dye made from lac and used to grace the feet and hands of women and dancers in the North East regions of India. I’ve always seen the dye in glass bottles that stain red even after using it once, making it difficult to store and handle, especially after one is dressed up. Glass bottles also make it scary to hold because if this breaks and falls you’ll have very deep red dye stains all over the place, forever.

So it was nice to find a plastic bottle shaped to be held comfortably. Found this one right outside a durga temple in Calcutta. Love the kitschness and joba-ness of the cover and love the shape of the bottle and the chauka depiction on the front. The chauka is the basic position in Odissi and symbolic of Lord Jagannath.

Not too sure how well that stopper will work once open, but will definitely be more seal-proof than the screw-type cap.

 

03_Kulture_Tube_PatternWhen ordering art prints online (which is where I spend a lot of time window-shopping nowadays), it’s nice to get it in a package that is durable (won’t have a scary, crushed corner when you receive it), is weather-resistant and looks classy enough for you to not trash it.

The talented folk at Kulture Shop put their heads together and came up with 2 options for your preciouses.

One – The tube sleeves in varied sizes for A4, A3 and A2 art prints. Inside is a protective, PH neutral, dry vessel to keep your new art safe from damage. There’s even tyvek (no tear-able) outer sleeves to safe guard the tubes in transit. As for the simple and bold print, Kulture Shop decided to go with silkscreen (in support of the disappearing art of silkscreen artisans). 

Two – The cases. These are designed to give maximum protection to the framed artwork. It has additional bubble wrap and craft cardboard corners to make sure the wooden frame joints are protected. There’s also the very convenient handle atop the case, in case you decide to gift it. Or even better, reuse it.

 

Via: Team Kulture.

Arjun Charanjiva (CEO, Founder), Kunal Anand (Creative Directer, Co-Founder), Jas Charanjiva (PR, Co-Founder) and Rajeev Sathe (Director, Co-Founder)

See their work here.

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The heritage art of beating malleable copper into sheets and then into different shapes is called Matharkaam (‘beaten work’). It’s this ancient tradition that Coppre has taken and contemporarised into modern day (very drool worthy) collectibles. Through their products, Coppre supports the few who still know this craft .

Hurricane LampThe art is characterised by the rough dots beaten on to it – making for ideal light-catchers and even better art. And it’s this that has been ever-so-subtly used on their packaging. Embossed and printed in copper on a very earthy brown pack.

To know more about Coppre, visit their FB page here.

To know more about the craft, read the Jaypore story here.

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Matt Lee is an artist and teacher from the UK, currently in Bangalore. He collects matchboxes across India and has 600 of them now. Featured here are some of the quirky and unseen ones. I recognised a few.

Indian matchboxes are tiny and contain just enough matchsticks to last you for a day. The result is that you’ll see these lying around a lot. I also like that so much colour and fun goes into something with a short life.

Though the ones here have been immortalised.

Via: Pii friend and writer, Amulya Shruthi. Click here to know more about Matt Lee.

265116_477792372284489_1939700428_n  Grey Garden has launched their Bento meals. Bento, traditionally a Japanese convenience meal, is meticulously packed with love (and a lot of times, with elaborate decorations on the food). The food is packed into either a disposable box using eco-friendly materials (like the one featured here) or there are the more expensive ones made of lacquerware. In India, we call it tiffin box.  But sushi in a tiffin box would so not be right, no?

Pic courtesy: The Grey Garden FB page.

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Truly unique packaging. Everytime I see the pack or even their logo, I drool.

Two lessons: 1. Don’t keep changing the pack design. 2. What the pack contains is very important.

 

PIcture by Pii-friend and Rang Decor author, Archana Srinivas.

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