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Handmade

Doug (dhug means cloud in Marathi) is a hand-crafted bracelet made by women cotton farmers in India to raise money in times of drought. It’s poetic that they’ve chosen the cloud to be a symbol of this hopeful initiative.

The packaging is a simple brown with the thought neatly laid out on the front and the bracelet displayed almost like it’s a floating cloud.

It’s easy-to-make, great to look at and can be neatly parceled off to those who want to help.

Get your Doug here.

 

 

Aparna Das Sadhukhan’s jewellery brand, Nine By Thirty is a work of love. So when she needed packaging for it, she turned to more love, her Ma.


Mrs D recycled beautiful old sarees and fabrics to make pouches for NBT’s necklaces and earrings.

Love all the emotions and designs surrounding this one.

Find Nine By Thirty here.

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Using the skills of India’s designers, Chindi uses the textile industries’ scrap materials to make the most pleasing products.Crochets, knots and a lot of love go into Chindi products.

This here is their market bag.

I’ve seen a lot of upcycled/recycled bags and none of them have the aesthetic balance Chindi’s products do.

Find them here.

 

p.s –

I personally like their yoga mat bag straps.

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In my increasingly-manic quest for dairy-free chocolate, I was blessed enough to have finally stumbled across Earth Loaf right here in Mysore, yoga’s second favourite destination. Emails flew back and forth and after prompt confirmation from David that it was indeed dairy-free, I ordered my first stash.

I am not going into detail about the exquisite, volcanic eruption of pure, slightly salty, slightly bitter cacao in my long-deprived soul; because this is a packaging blog.

The packaging reminded me of the love with which I used to wrap gifts when I first discovered Auroville handmade paper. In this case, the paper is made from recycled cotton and silk and screen-printed with motifs of peacocks and elephants. The motif is Chittara art of the Malnad region and designed by Mysore-based Harsha Nagaraju. David, of Earth Loaf, has used cacao beans and palmyra sugar from the region and intends for the packaging to be from there too.

What I liked the most – line on the back of the pack that reads “Made, packed and loved by:….”

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The charming Love Travel series of city guides are known for their treasure trove of authentic Indian luxury travel tips. All laid out in a style that is almost like chatting with a friend over a cuppachai. The book is crafted out of handmade paper and the packaging is truly packed in India. Handcrafted with love and Indianness from start to end.

The book cover has been developed in partnership with Sonam Dubal, a  fashion designer and is printed on khadi, hand-woven in Andhra Pradesh, and supplied by Gramodyog Khadi Mandir, Bengaluru.

The luxury edition silk and khadi pouches have been designed by Sonali of Hidden Harmony, Bengaluru. The khadi is from Andhra and the silk is Mysore silk.

The striking rich blue, the simplicity of khadi and the juxtaposition of this with the luscious silk is exactly what the brand is all about.

To order your copy of the newest in Fiona Caulfield’s Love Travel series, click here.

Join Love Travel on FB, right here.

Pic courtesy: Fiona Caulfield.

265116_477792372284489_1939700428_n  Grey Garden has launched their Bento meals. Bento, traditionally a Japanese convenience meal, is meticulously packed with love (and a lot of times, with elaborate decorations on the food). The food is packed into either a disposable box using eco-friendly materials (like the one featured here) or there are the more expensive ones made of lacquerware. In India, we call it tiffin box.  But sushi in a tiffin box would so not be right, no?

Pic courtesy: The Grey Garden FB page.

 

 

Out of all the TJ’s packaging I just went through, this one spoke of an India that’s fast disappearing. I thought I should feature it before we move completely to an e-docs in e-folders world.

P.S –

TJ, by the way, is Tihar Jail. The inmates make these. Click here to see all their products.

 

It’s a good, chunky bath bar. It’s also natural, made by hand and does minimal harm to the environment. The packaging’s the same – It’s one piece of cardboard that is wrapped around the soap, it’s biodegradable, the inks are safer than the normal ones we are used to seeing and the branding is enhanced by embossing it right onto the pack. Read more about it here on their site.

What I liked more was that the site also gave some genuinely good tips on how to reuse the packaging. Use it to store earrings and small knick-knacks. Or (my favourite) pop it into your linen drawer. I’d also cut it into long strips and use them as bookmarks. Mark your favourite poem with a favourite fragrance. La.

Meet Arrev on FB here. Buy Areev here.

It’s made by hand on a farm and the packaging complements that.

The homely Madras checkered cotton wrap for the lid,  a nice thin light brown paper for the label and the use of just one single, yummy colour. The cost of putting that wrap on top of every jar is balanced by doing this single colour print job on the label. Smart.

Pic: Pii

Available: At most large department stores. Or you could just visit them here when you’re in South India.

Next time someone is off to Rajasthan and asks you what you want, here’s what you want. Handmade kajal. I love that Purvi (who gifted it to Kavita) put it into this beautiful silver box. One that, when empty, will inspire you to make your own kajal and fill it up again.

Picture & lead, via Pii friend, Kavita Rayirath.

What Pii really appreciates is when one uses material around them to pack a product. Bipha Ayurveda‘s soaps and incense sticks (they have a whole range of other goodies too) come wrapped (in a very easy, uncomplicated way) in natural coconut tree fibres. To add a hint of colour, the edges are woven with coloured thread. A loose, breathable style that is very common in Kerala.

p.s –

Love their products too. Authentic ayurveda. The real stuff. Shop here.

Cool way to hop onto bus or bullock cart without dying of thirst 5 minutes later.

Deets: Handmade by rural folkswomen for brand Jugaad. Picture and online retail therapy from spanking new iTokri here.

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