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Handmade

 

It’s a good, chunky bath bar. It’s also natural, made by hand and does minimal harm to the environment. The packaging’s the same – It’s one piece of cardboard that is wrapped around the soap, it’s biodegradable, the inks are safer than the normal ones we are used to seeing and the branding is enhanced by embossing it right onto the pack. Read more about it here on their site.

What I liked more was that the site also gave some genuinely good tips on how to reuse the packaging. Use it to store earrings and small knick-knacks. Or (my favourite) pop it into your linen drawer. I’d also cut it into long strips and use them as bookmarks. Mark your favourite poem with a favourite fragrance. La.

Meet Arrev on FB here. Buy Areev here.

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It’s made by hand on a farm and the packaging complements that.

The homely Madras checkered cotton wrap for the lid,  a nice thin light brown paper for the label and the use of just one single, yummy colour. The cost of putting that wrap on top of every jar is balanced by doing this single colour print job on the label. Smart.

Pic: Pii

Available: At most large department stores. Or you could just visit them here when you’re in South India.

Next time someone is off to Rajasthan and asks you what you want, here’s what you want. Handmade kajal. I love that Purvi (who gifted it to Kavita) put it into this beautiful silver box. One that, when empty, will inspire you to make your own kajal and fill it up again.

Picture & lead, via Pii friend, Kavita Rayirath.

What Pii really appreciates is when one uses material around them to pack a product. Bipha Ayurveda‘s soaps and incense sticks (they have a whole range of other goodies too) come wrapped (in a very easy, uncomplicated way) in natural coconut tree fibres. To add a hint of colour, the edges are woven with coloured thread. A loose, breathable style that is very common in Kerala.

p.s –

Love their products too. Authentic ayurveda. The real stuff. Shop here.

Cool way to hop onto bus or bullock cart without dying of thirst 5 minutes later.

Deets: Handmade by rural folkswomen for brand Jugaad. Picture and online retail therapy from spanking new iTokri here.

Little camphor flames surrounded by marigold and roses, held together in dried leaves stitched together with bits of twig and set afloat down a moody Ganga at dusk to depict the journey of the soul through life.

But thanks to ‘spiritual’ tourism it was – make a wish and if it goes down the river smooth, your wish will come true.

No matter what, that basket is as fragile and as vibrant as life.

 

Must do: Haridwar evening aarti.

Urulis have traditionally been used for cooking in Kerala. But today, they’re used for everything but that. In beautiful shades of old gold, and available in any size, old urulis can be used to hold fresh jasmine, marigold or scented floating candles.  I use mine for magazines as it’s just the right size. My grandmother gives the old ones to the hens to lay their eggs in. Really!

Saundhi Mitti, however, has given new life to the old uruli and brought them back in a new avatar in ceramic and lovely, earthy shades. Click here to see the entire range and a host of other objets.

Via, talented Pii friend, Archana Srinivas.

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