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Kitschy Indian art has always been a likely winner at international ad festivals. Here we see a classic formula. Sex + Ethnic art = Silver

Just hoping a few truckers out there are actually using this, because the problem is real and the packs out there, far too few. Tata Motors really should make this a nation-wide campaign (if it isn’t already) so that every highway-blaring driver out there gets these colourful, uber distracting condoms to rip and place atop a creaky cot under the stars.

Via – CC, of The Sole Sisters & here.

p.s –

Dipper refers to lorry headlights, not the organ.

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Nicobar (Good Earth’s hipster arm) has come out with an innovative little piece that is so connected to all they do and feel. A bar of chocolate crafted exclusively for Nicobar by the talented Mandakini (who was recently featured on their blog for her baked goodnesses). The bar’s packaging features their current tropical palette. How beautifully linked and delicious.

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Pics: From the Nicobar FB page and site.

Doug (dhug means cloud in Marathi) is a hand-crafted bracelet made by women cotton farmers in India to raise money in times of drought. It’s poetic that they’ve chosen the cloud to be a symbol of this hopeful initiative.

The packaging is a simple brown with the thought neatly laid out on the front and the bracelet displayed almost like it’s a floating cloud.

It’s easy-to-make, great to look at and can be neatly parceled off to those who want to help.

Get your Doug here.

 

 

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In my increasingly-manic quest for dairy-free chocolate, I was blessed enough to have finally stumbled across Earth Loaf right here in Mysore, yoga’s second favourite destination. Emails flew back and forth and after prompt confirmation from David that it was indeed dairy-free, I ordered my first stash.

I am not going into detail about the exquisite, volcanic eruption of pure, slightly salty, slightly bitter cacao in my long-deprived soul; because this is a packaging blog.

The packaging reminded me of the love with which I used to wrap gifts when I first discovered Auroville handmade paper. In this case, the paper is made from recycled cotton and silk and screen-printed with motifs of peacocks and elephants. The motif is Chittara art of the Malnad region and designed by Mysore-based Harsha Nagaraju. David, of Earth Loaf, has used cacao beans and palmyra sugar from the region and intends for the packaging to be from there too.

What I liked the most – line on the back of the pack that reads “Made, packed and loved by:….”

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Matt Lee is an artist and teacher from the UK, currently in Bangalore. He collects matchboxes across India and has 600 of them now. Featured here are some of the quirky and unseen ones. I recognised a few.

Indian matchboxes are tiny and contain just enough matchsticks to last you for a day. The result is that you’ll see these lying around a lot. I also like that so much colour and fun goes into something with a short life.

Though the ones here have been immortalised.

Via: Pii friend and writer, Amulya Shruthi. Click here to know more about Matt Lee.

 

 

Out of all the TJ’s packaging I just went through, this one spoke of an India that’s fast disappearing. I thought I should feature it before we move completely to an e-docs in e-folders world.

P.S –

TJ, by the way, is Tihar Jail. The inmates make these. Click here to see all their products.

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Truly unique packaging. Everytime I see the pack or even their logo, I drool.

Two lessons: 1. Don’t keep changing the pack design. 2. What the pack contains is very important.

 

PIcture by Pii-friend and Rang Decor author, Archana Srinivas.

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The bake tray also works as the take away pack. No waste of water (in washing dishes), no unnecessary cutting and transferring to a new box, no fuss. Just the deliciousness of good, organic, hand-baked cakes in an easy-to-carry, easy-to-store, biodegradable box with a sprinkling of mystikal magicness.

Order yours here or email taantraa.cakes@gmail.com

It’s a book of 500 kitschy Indian matchbox covers in a book that’s designed to look like a matchbox, complete with slip case and striking edge, in case you feel like setting the whole book on fire. The printing quality is not too great (pixelated), but the finds are lovely, and it makes a great smoking-table book.

Via, Pii friend, Amulya Shruthi. Meet her here and here.

Buy the book and meet Tara here.

 

It’s a good, chunky bath bar. It’s also natural, made by hand and does minimal harm to the environment. The packaging’s the same – It’s one piece of cardboard that is wrapped around the soap, it’s biodegradable, the inks are safer than the normal ones we are used to seeing and the branding is enhanced by embossing it right onto the pack. Read more about it here on their site.

What I liked more was that the site also gave some genuinely good tips on how to reuse the packaging. Use it to store earrings and small knick-knacks. Or (my favourite) pop it into your linen drawer. I’d also cut it into long strips and use them as bookmarks. Mark your favourite poem with a favourite fragrance. La.

Meet Arrev on FB here. Buy Areev here.

Maheshwari fabrics are known for their gossamer-thin delicate drape and their vibrant colours. What better way to show the fineness of the fabric than to use the very threads that made the fabric to attach the tag onto Rehwa‘s simple carry bag.

Well thought through.

It’s the vintage green, chocolate brown and white combo that had me flat. That, and the fact, that this is packed and manufactured in a very Anglo-Indian part of Bangalore – Langford Town.

Showing a neatly starched, crisp white shirt on the cover ensures the bais know what this is used for. The powder within is held in a thin plastic pouch, ensuring reusability without too much fuss.

The packaging is thin cardboard and looks like it’ll melt into the ground the minute it’s discarded. Friendly.

Pic: Pii.

Available: At Nilgiris, Brigade Road, Bangalore.

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