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It’s made by hand on a farm and the packaging complements that.

The homely Madras checkered cotton wrap for the lid,  a nice thin light brown paper for the label and the use of just one single, yummy colour. The cost of putting that wrap on top of every jar is balanced by doing this single colour print job on the label. Smart.

Pic: Pii

Available: At most large department stores. Or you could just visit them here when you’re in South India.

Pii received her first gift :)

It’s a precious vintage matchbox from Russia. All four sides can be used to strike and the matchsticks sit snug within these 4 walls. And when not playing the role of a matchbox, it sits quietly on a table looking like a normal little box.

Love the art-deco feel of the colours and design on the cover, very strict, controlled kind of art.  I have no idea what the word means though.

Pic: Pii

With love: From Haki, Pii’s uncle-in-law. A gypsy soul who hitchhiked his way from India to Europe in the decade of hippy power. He currently spends time between Europe, Kerala and the Cholamandal Artists Village in Chennai. Meet him on FB here.

 

It’s the vintage green, chocolate brown and white combo that had me flat. That, and the fact, that this is packed and manufactured in a very Anglo-Indian part of Bangalore – Langford Town.

Showing a neatly starched, crisp white shirt on the cover ensures the bais know what this is used for. The powder within is held in a thin plastic pouch, ensuring reusability without too much fuss.

The packaging is thin cardboard and looks like it’ll melt into the ground the minute it’s discarded. Friendly.

Pic: Pii.

Available: At Nilgiris, Brigade Road, Bangalore.

Loved the brown paper simplicity of its arrival.

(What’s inside? Organic, bunny-ear soft tee-shirts)

This package is proof that good words straight from the heart will work way more wonders than complicated, overly colourful packaging.

Get your pack home here. 

What Pii really appreciates is when one uses material around them to pack a product. Bipha Ayurveda‘s soaps and incense sticks (they have a whole range of other goodies too) come wrapped (in a very easy, uncomplicated way) in natural coconut tree fibres. To add a hint of colour, the edges are woven with coloured thread. A loose, breathable style that is very common in Kerala.

p.s –

Love their products too. Authentic ayurveda. The real stuff. Shop here.

Pii loved it for its simple, retro tin and more importantly, for its bold use of colours and font.

The Cadbury purple and a delicious orangeness (very 80s fluorescent) of that sans-serif font. Confident chopping of the word to give importance to the size.

That is the cool

est.

 

Picture: Pii

Little camphor flames surrounded by marigold and roses, held together in dried leaves stitched together with bits of twig and set afloat down a moody Ganga at dusk to depict the journey of the soul through life.

But thanks to ‘spiritual’ tourism it was – make a wish and if it goes down the river smooth, your wish will come true.

No matter what, that basket is as fragile and as vibrant as life.

 

Must do: Haridwar evening aarti.

They come large enough to pickle a body in and small enough to store your favourite spices in. Traditionally, however, these have been used for pickles. The cool ceramic balances the heat generated within the pot with the chillies and oils. The colours are also soothing (cream and biscuit brown). It’s to calm the crazy pickle inside.

I use one as a flower vase though.

Available: Everywhere in India.

 

Kumkum is used in Hinduism as a protective mark for the sixth chakra or the ajna chakra. The powder is actually safrron that turns a brilliant red after slaked lime is added to it.

Kumkum is also worn religiously by good Hindu wives. Which explains why Eyetex here has used the actress (Deepika) who played Lord Ram’s wife in the epic-super-dhamaka-hit-television-series, Ramayana.

Pii love the jasmine in Deepika’s hair. Heavenly jasmine and earthy kumkum scents. Someone bottle ’em, please!

Picture courtesy: Pii.

 

A bottle of Rooh Afza is a bottle of concentrated goodness. Filled with water lily and rose extracts, raisins, fruits and a whole lot of other exotic goodies. It’s best had with cold milk and one ice cube. My mum used to make me drink it and give me the bottle to hold so I’d be distracted by all the colours on the label.

This picture here was taken  on the streets of Haridwar where Rooh Afza is used in a cold sweet dish that I refused to taste!

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