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Aparna Das Sadhukhan’s jewellery brand, Nine By Thirty is a work of love. So when she needed packaging for it, she turned to more love, her Ma.


Mrs D recycled beautiful old sarees and fabrics to make pouches for NBT’s necklaces and earrings.

Love all the emotions and designs surrounding this one.

Find Nine By Thirty here.

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In my increasingly-manic quest for dairy-free chocolate, I was blessed enough to have finally stumbled across Earth Loaf right here in Mysore, yoga’s second favourite destination. Emails flew back and forth and after prompt confirmation from David that it was indeed dairy-free, I ordered my first stash.

I am not going into detail about the exquisite, volcanic eruption of pure, slightly salty, slightly bitter cacao in my long-deprived soul; because this is a packaging blog.

The packaging reminded me of the love with which I used to wrap gifts when I first discovered Auroville handmade paper. In this case, the paper is made from recycled cotton and silk and screen-printed with motifs of peacocks and elephants. The motif is Chittara art of the Malnad region and designed by Mysore-based Harsha Nagaraju. David, of Earth Loaf, has used cacao beans and palmyra sugar from the region and intends for the packaging to be from there too.

What I liked the most – line on the back of the pack that reads “Made, packed and loved by:….”

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Alta or Rose Bengal is a deep red dye made from lac and used to grace the feet and hands of women and dancers in the North East regions of India. I’ve always seen the dye in glass bottles that stain red even after using it once, making it difficult to store and handle, especially after one is dressed up. Glass bottles also make it scary to hold because if this breaks and falls you’ll have very deep red dye stains all over the place, forever.

So it was nice to find a plastic bottle shaped to be held comfortably. Found this one right outside a durga temple in Calcutta. Love the kitschness and joba-ness of the cover and love the shape of the bottle and the chauka depiction on the front. The chauka is the basic position in Odissi and symbolic of Lord Jagannath.

Not too sure how well that stopper will work once open, but will definitely be more seal-proof than the screw-type cap.

 

A scarf, a thin rectangular towel, a dupatta, a sari, the lungi. Any of these can make the perfect carrier for that just-about-anything you’re worrying about lugging around – Screaming babies, giggly puppies, bricks or books.

What I find most appealing though is the storage factor once you’re done with it – folds neatly away and takes up minimal space.

Unfuss India.

12652304.a00df55b.1024Picture and story via Gopal MS and his fab Mumbai Paused blog. Click here to visit it.

 

The heritage art of beating malleable copper into sheets and then into different shapes is called Matharkaam (‘beaten work’). It’s this ancient tradition that Coppre has taken and contemporarised into modern day (very drool worthy) collectibles. Through their products, Coppre supports the few who still know this craft .

Hurricane LampThe art is characterised by the rough dots beaten on to it – making for ideal light-catchers and even better art. And it’s this that has been ever-so-subtly used on their packaging. Embossed and printed in copper on a very earthy brown pack.

To know more about Coppre, visit their FB page here.

To know more about the craft, read the Jaypore story here.

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image-1I like it when brands think like your mother. They give you a good quality ingredient (asafoetida) and put it into a package that fits perfectly well into your kitchen – once you carefully peel the label off, that is. This steel dabba can continue holding hing from other brands way after this is done. Good, confident one, Aachi.

I picked mine up at the Village supermarket on Wheeler Road, Bangalore.

Picture courtesy: My iPhone5. May its tribe continue to grow.

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Cotton thread packaging in cotton thread packaging.

Cotton thread is used in India to pack a lot of things. From parcels to your idli-vada evening takeaway.

Really like the red-ink stamped brown paper wrap that advertises this Ahmedabad store’s range.

Via: Avani Tanya who I (barely) mentored for her soulful Bangalore project which you can view here.

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