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Out of all the TJ’s packaging I just went through, this one spoke of an India that’s fast disappearing. I thought I should feature it before we move completely to an e-docs in e-folders world.

P.S –

TJ, by the way, is Tihar Jail. The inmates make these. Click here to see all their products.

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These two little boxes contain haldi and kumkum. Each one promises to sit comfortably in the middle of your palm while you stand on tip-toe and peek into a mirror to apply kumkum on your forehead.

The colours on the boxes, the illustrations and the fonts – All kitsch. All Goddess-friendly.

Via (and photographed) by Archana Srinivas of Rang Decor.

Meet the entire range of Gopuram products here.

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Truly unique packaging. Everytime I see the pack or even their logo, I drool.

Two lessons: 1. Don’t keep changing the pack design. 2. What the pack contains is very important.

 

PIcture by Pii-friend and Rang Decor author, Archana Srinivas.

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Sturdy, intelligently designed (handle goes all the way down for extra strength) and roomy, the kirana shop bag is usually hung up in front of the shop where you can grab it and fill it with everything you need. The rectangular base makes sure it sits firm on the back of a cycle (or a car). The thin fabric or plastic is very pro-folding and tucking-into-bag too. But I’m still a sucker for the overall design :p

Via, Pii friend, Rang Decor author and photographer – Archana Srinivas. She pointed out that the site she found it on (here) had got it wrong. She’s emailed them :) Phew.

It’s the vintage green, chocolate brown and white combo that had me flat. That, and the fact, that this is packed and manufactured in a very Anglo-Indian part of Bangalore – Langford Town.

Showing a neatly starched, crisp white shirt on the cover ensures the bais know what this is used for. The powder within is held in a thin plastic pouch, ensuring reusability without too much fuss.

The packaging is thin cardboard and looks like it’ll melt into the ground the minute it’s discarded. Friendly.

Pic: Pii.

Available: At Nilgiris, Brigade Road, Bangalore.

An earthy ceramic container with an earthier hued kalamkari fabric as a lid wrap. Promises to put the plastic jars on your spice rack to tearful shame.

Via, Kavita Rayirath of Indian By Design.

Picture courtesy: The Jiyo site.

Next time someone is off to Rajasthan and asks you what you want, here’s what you want. Handmade kajal. I love that Purvi (who gifted it to Kavita) put it into this beautiful silver box. One that, when empty, will inspire you to make your own kajal and fill it up again.

Picture & lead, via Pii friend, Kavita Rayirath.

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